Thursday, June 21, 2007

Interview with Kim Robinson

Kim Robinson is stopping by my blog on her virtual book tour. I almost participated in a booksigning with her in Los Angeles, but couldn’t find the restaurant where it was being held. On the Internet, I’ve known Kim for a long while.

Here’s the questions I asked Kim.

Marilyn: First, I feel like I already know you though we never actually connected.

Kim: We have connected you were one of the first ebook authors who participated in my virtual cookbooks, Sweet Satisfaction and Food for the Soul. Someday I hope to actually meet you. I know we will one day, and I am looking forward to it.

Marilyn: Your book, Roux in the Gumbo, is so rich with history and color of the time and place--and I know you wrote it with love. Did you have special feelings while writing it? Like were you were in touch with those you were writing about?

Kim: My Grandmother mostly but I do feel that people came to me in my dreams and showed me their lives. I feel like I am helping people know how hard it was back in the day. I don’t what I would have done if I had to find my own food in my back yard everyday, thank god for grocery stores.

Marilyn: What was your inspiration for writing this book? When did the idea first come to you?
Kim: One day we were watching Oprah talk about her life and upcoming book, Grandmother said "Shoot, I had more stuff happen to me than she did, someone should write my book. Shoot you should write one too." She started telling one them old stories, you know the kind you have heard a few times growing up and since the computer was set up right next to the pull-out couch in the den where I spent my days "I said, ‘ Let's do it. I bet everybody in the family would like to read it.’"

When she went back home I bought her a tape recorder so that when she thought of something she could tape it and send it to me. Every few months I sent her tickets and she would come and stay for a while and we worked on the book. I also went to Lafayette, Louisiana where my Great- grandmother’s name still rings like a church house bell.

My grandmother suffered a stroke during spinal cancer surgery and went into a coma. I printed out what I had and went to California, I would sit by her bed reading and the family asked me what I was reading. And when I told them, they said they wanted to read it, my mother made some copies and gave them out. One day while I was reading to my grandmother she said my name, though still in a coma.

She died the next day. Everyone said that I had to finish the book and share it with the world. When I went back home my family members would call and give me their memories and send tapes that I added to the book. My grandmother's sister, Genevieve, and I would talk over the phone. I sent her a ticket to come but, sadly, she got sick and died before she could come, but I did get everything she wanted in.

My mother came and started reading and giving me her memories and there you have it. The title is because everyone who has someone who influenced their lives just as the Roux (Roo) base or gravy in Gumbo influences every spoonful. The book details my families life from the 1800's to 1997.

Marilyn: What is the most exciting thing that's happened since the book was published?

Kim: Every booksigning, every review, every person that writes to tell me that they enjoyed the book

Marilyn: What are your future writing plans?

Kim: Next is my life story, raped by a preacher at the age of five, I had no relationship with God. I became a drug dealer and addict. Now I speak in churches helping others know they too can change. After that, is my G-mama series – this sixty eight year old believes it takes a village to raise a child, she sits on her porch with her gin and juice and as crimes cross her porch she makes the perpetrators an offer they can’t refuse. You see she also believes that the penitentiary ain’t nothing but college for criminals. You need to make up for your sins in God’s eyes. G-mama is a vehicle for me to shed light on a lot of wrongs in this world. Not only in the ghetto but everywhere.

I have several other books that will be coming out, you can read about them on

www.kim-robinson.com

Thank you for having me, Marilyn. Can’t wait for you to blog with me.

Marilyn: Thank you so much, Kim. I’ll be looking forward to the day we can meet face-to-face. Good luck with Roux in the Gumbo and all your other writing.

Be sure and visit Kim's website.

2 comments:

Dorothy said...

Great interview, both of you!!! Thanks, Marilyn!!!

Kim Robinson said...

Thank you so much for having me Marilyn