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The Importance of Setting by Thonie Hevron

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In a recent post, our host Marilyn Meredith talked about setting and why it is important. I think it’s only fair to share with her my thoughts on setting. Setting is the reason I got serious about writing. I’d always written but never seriously and rarely completed a work. By 1997, I’d spent two decades in law enforcement in Northern California. When my fire fighter husband suffered a career-ending injury, we stepped up plans to retire to the high desert/mountains. Until I qualified to retire—a few years at most—I got a job as a dispatcher at a small municipal police department. It took less than a year in the Sierras when I found myself so homesick that even the catastrophic floods of 1996-97 in my old neighborhood made me want to be back in Sonoma County. I’d worked three previous floods and missed helping during the disasters. One night, seeking a bit of solace, I scratched out a description of a Russian River (Sonoma County) home I saw in a magazine. Then the seed of a story b

Let's Talk About Typos

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Oh, my, no matter how hard we try, those typos sneak in! Not only in my books, I find them in others, even those from big publishers. I can assure you that I and my editor have gone over every book looking for mistakes, typos and other problems. And we find a lot and correct them. Yet, when the book goes out, typos pop up again! My sister and one of my daughters have Eagle eyes and let me know about typos they've found. Since I'm self-published, my editor is able to fix them, but the books and e-books that are already in the hands of others will still have those typos. Folks, we try--but it's like there are gremlins hiding who delight in switching words, adding something that shouldn't be there. Whatever the reason, I can assure you I'm sorry. One answer others have said, is when we (the author and the editor) know what's supposed to be there, our brain makes the correction. And yes, my latest, Not as We Knew It probably still has a typos or two lurking.  Check

INTERVIEW OF TWO MAIN CHARACTERS IN THE SPIRIT WOMAN OF LOCKLEER MOUNTAIN

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As there are two main characters in the Spirit Woman novel, the interview is with both characters. Lou: Shoemaker: How did you come to own a sewer truck called The Pooper Scooper?  This was my husband’s business, but he died in a car crash a little over two years ago. I had to learn the business, get a Waste Management license, and learn to drive a stick shift pretty quickly. In a rural community like Lockleer Mountain, the homes have wells and septic tanks. With all the bells and whistles on the sewer truck, it wasn’t too hard to learn how to operate and clean septic tanks. It may not be a very ladylike occupation, but it keeps the roof over my head and my two cats in Kitty Crunchies. We make it work. How familiar are you with the Native American reservation near Lockleer Mountain? I know many of the Native Americans and many are my customers. Chief White Feather has been a family friend for years. He told us the legend of the Spirit Woman when we were children. The story line i

Writing About the Plague in Fiction

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Writers have been saying they'd never include anything about the virus in a book, and readers said they didn't want to read one.  Something I didn't really like hearing because I didn't see how I could write another Rocky Bluff P.D. mystery without including what we've all been experiencing. After all, the RBPD series is more or less set in real time. So, I did what I felt I had to do. Sales have not been wonderful, but those who've read it so far have liked it. On my Kindle I've been reading Michael Connelly's latest Mickey Haller mystery (which is great, by the way), and guess what? The virus is mentioned many times--beginning with the first hints of it coming from Hunan, China. Wow! Do I feel better now. I know I made the right choice. And I bet Connelly fans won't quit reading because there's mention of the virus in this book. Any of you brave and want to see how I handled the virus in Not As We Knew It, you can get it in paperback or for Kin

Let's Talk About Titles Again

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Quite often on Facebook authors ask for help coming up with a title for their upcoming book. Some have no trouble at all and know the title before they even begin writing. Others report using a phrase from the book itself. Titles come to me in various ways. If I do have trouble, I ask my critique group for suggestions for all of them have heard most of the book during our get-togethers. Bones in the Attic  is one that I had help with. Another unusual title came from a writer friend who said, "Why don't you write a book with the title Murder in the Worst Degree ?" I did, but really didn't know how I was going to tie in the title with what I'd written so far until I got to the last three chapters, then it all fell in place. End of the Trail  was an obvious title for the content of the book, but it made readers think that was the last Deputy Tempe Crabtree  mystery and frankly, me too--until another idea popped into my head. I'm working on that one now. (And yes,

WITHOUT A HEAD, A Dying to be Beautiful Mystery

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Dying To Be Beautiful: Without A Head,                                                        By M.Glenda Rosen (aka Marcia Rosen) Re-released by Level Best Books, books, 2, 3 and 4 in the series are soon to follow. Jenna Preston is used to investigating cheating spouses, fraud, and even a murder or two in her role as a private investigator. But she’s never consulted on a case quite like the one at Darcy’s Salon in East Hampton. A killer has struck and left behind a woman’s head in the upscale salon’s shampoo sink.   As Jenna struggles to make sense of the what’s happened, she comes up against entitled and badly behaved beach dwellers, greedy parties with motives all their own, and the billion dollar beauty industry. With her loyal dog Watson at her side, Jenna pieces together clues and tracks down a killer who claims victims that are dying to be beautiful.   DYING TO BE BEAUTIFUL is a fascinating look into the multi-million dollar world of beauty and the things people will do

Our Happy New Year Tradition!

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We are all hoping for a much different 2021! Looking forward to the end of the virus and the world getting back to a new normal. Our celebration will be simple--tamales for dinner, and rootbeer floats. Rootbeer floats have been our tradition way back when the kids were little--many years ago. This time we'll be enjoying them with the great grands. Tomorrow is the big day for my traditional seafood gumbo. My recipe that I adapted from a neighbor, crablegs and shrimp are the stars in this dish. Starts from a turkey carcass boiled down and the addition of chicken broth, onions, canned  tomato bits, sliced okra, several dashes of Tabasco sauce, plus at the last minute, the addition of the crab legs and shrimp into the boiling liquid. Served over rice. It is delicious and sloppy to eat. We have lots of utensil to crack the crab and pick out every bit of the meat. It's so easy to make and turns out so delicious. Afterwards, we'll play Estimation, a game for all ages. Fun and a bi