Friday's PSWA

It  was a busy day, and hooray, the smart ones (tech wise) managed to download what we needed from the Cloud for those who had visuals to go along with their presentations. We also received the good news that our official tech would be arriving late Friday.

We started the day with a great panel on adding realism to your novel/stories. In the days to come I'll give an indepth report on each of these presentation.

Joe Haggarty gave a dynamite talk about The Prostitution Culture--and pointed out who most of the prostitutes began as exploited or abused children. Quite an eye-opener.

The promotion panel was great--as usual. I think everyone learned some new tips, including those of us on the panel.

Lunch was a huge salad with a most decadent dessert following it.

Steve Scarborough entertained us with a talk about Early Detectives--real and fiction and the first authors of detective fiction.

Building a Suspenseful Scene was our next panel--and we heard some great tips on how each author did it.

Doug Wyllie, the Editor in Chief of Police.one livened things up while explaining what he is lookingfor in  a column for his several public safety online newspapers.

Our last anle of the day was Findingthe Right Publisher for your book, and different optins were pointed out.

It was a busy day. Got a lot of networking and plain old visiting in. And topped the day off having dinner with friends.  (Not that I could eat much after our huge lunch.)

Marilyn

Comments

You are quite the dynamo, Marilyn! You've already got posts up about the conference ~ I'm so impressed (then again, I'm always impressed with you :-). It is going beautifully. The wisdom coming from the fine array of panelists is terrific ~ and entertaining, to boot! Sad that the last day is almost upon us :-(
Dee Card said…
Glad you are posting these updates Marilyn ( and in almost real time, no less). I miss going to these conferences. Miss the info and the people.

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