Tuesday, December 31, 2013

Last Day of Mundania's Big 40% Off Sale



 In Calling the Dead Deputy Tempe Crabtree calls back the dead for the first time in order to find out the truth about a murder and a suicide.

This experience is what opens the door into the supernatural and is the reason she sees spirits in future books.

There are some characters in this tale based on real people. One is the principal at the grammar school. She is fashioned after a teacher who taught children, their children and their grandchildren. Still alive, she is an icon in the town I live in. Still spry, energetic and the town historian. She was instrumental in the creation of our local museum.

I run into her from time to time in the local beauty salon and I know I'm going to hear an interesting tidbit either about something that happened in the past, or more recently.

http://mundania.com/book.php?title=Calling%20the%20Dead

And remember the code is HOLIDAY.

Since this is the last day of the sale, tomorrow I'll be back to blogging about other things.

And thank you everyone who took advantage of this sale.

Marilyn

Monday, December 30, 2013

2 Days Left in Mundania's 40% Off Sale



In Judgment Fire Tempe discovers why she hasn't embraced her Native American heritage.

Though all of the Tempe Crabtree mysteries have some reference to Indian legends and rituals, from the beginning, Tempe hasn't known much about them, or even seemed to want to learn.

Nick Two John has been the one person who has relentlessly given Tempe bits and pieces of knowledge about what it means to be an Indian, but she hasn't accepted it as much as one might expect.

Now there are only two days left for this sale:

http://mundania.com/book.php?title=Judgment%20Fire

Marilyn

Sunday, December 29, 2013

Only Three Days Left in Mundania's Big Sale

 
When I wrote Raging Water, I had the deaths of two women who went to our church in mind.
 
Both these women died on the same night. They were poor, lived in the cheapest places possible, best friends, both had many ailments.
 
When they died, no autopsy was done. They were what I might call "throw-away" people. Only one step from homeless, both had to have a lot of help from the church, sometimes for rent money, often a ride to the doctor and for food to make it to the end of the month.
 
Both women were on a lot of medication, and some of that medication was missing from their homes. Wouldn't that make you suspicious? It did me, but not local law enforcement.
 
That was the beginning of the creation of Raging Water.
 
I dedicated the book to these two women.
 
Another interesting fact about Raging Water is the character Miqui Sherwood. She is based in both looks and personality on a real person who begged me to put her in a book. All of her friends said I nailed her.
 
And she'll appear again in the books I'm writing now--which as yet has no name--and I need to get bus on it.
 
Remember, Raging Water, is 40% off at Mundania until December 31. Use the code HOLIDAY.
 
 


Saturday, December 28, 2013

Counting Down, 4 days left!

Want to start at the beginning of the Deputy Tempe Crabtree series?

Deadly Trail is called book 0 by Mundania. I prefer to call it the prequel.

It was the first one written in the series and the introduction of Pastor Hutch, Tempe's son, Blair, Nick Two John and the Bear Creek Inn, which I merely called The Inn in this book.

The book was first published by Hard Shell Word Factory.


To by it at Mundania's 40% discount, put in the code HOLIDAY.


http://www.mundania.com/book.php?title=Deadly%20Trail


Friday, December 27, 2013

Only a Few More Days!


Only a few more days to take advantage of Mundania's big 40% off sale.

All of my Deputy Tempe Crabtree mysteries are available through Mundania.

One of my favorites is Dispel the Mist.




http://mundania.com/book.php?title=Dispel%20the%20Mist

One of the characters in Dispel the Mist is the Hairy Man, a Big Foot type legend who lives in the mountains above the Bear Creek Indian Reservation.

The drawing on the cover, is a replica of the pictograph that is actually in a rock shelter on the Tule River Indian Reservation, which is the inspiration for all of my tales that end up on the Indian Reservation.

Though I've never had an encounter with the Hairy Man, Tempe does in Dispel the Mist.

If you've never read this book, now's the time. All you have to do to get the 40% discount is enter the word HOLIDAY in the place for a code.

This offer will be over on December 31, so hurry!

Marilyn

Wednesday, December 25, 2013

Merry Christmas





Jesus is the reason for the season.


 
Merry Christmas one and all!
 
 
I hope you found what you most desired under the Christmas tree.
 
Over the years, I've celebrated many Christmases. Every Christmas when I was a child was wonderful.
 
When I had children of my own, watching the children open their gifts was always a blessing.
 
There were some hard Christmases--the ones when my husband was serving in Vietnam and couldn't come home.
 
Once I had to work a split-shift at the phone company and missed seeing the kids open their gifts.
 
A few times there wasn't much money to buy gifts for the kids--but somehow I managed to come up with enough to please them.
 
But--the wonderful Christmases far outweighed the harder ones.
 
Some of the best Christmases were ones we shared with others such as buying gifts for children of prisoners through Angel Tree.
 
Giving presents, a tree and decorations and all the ingredients for Christmas dinner to a needy family. (Did that with a sorority I belonged to at the time.)
 
I hope today finds you surrounded by your family and friends.
 
Marilyn
 
 
 
 

 

Monday, December 23, 2013

What Do You Do on Christmas Eve?

 
Thinking way back--and with me, that's a long, long time ago, when my sister and I were children, our family always stayed home on Christmas Eve. We went to bed early, hoping to sleep in order to wake early and see what wonderful gifts we might fine in front of the hearth.

My parents needed plenty of time to bring out the presents. Even though we didn't have much money, they always managed to give us the most wonderful gifts.

Years later, when my husband and I had kids of our own, some Christmas Eve's were also spent at my parents' home and we spent a lot of the night before Christmas putting together complicated toys. And when Christmas Eve was at our own home, we had the same dilemma of figuring out directions to complicated toys. And with five kids, there was always something that took half the night to do.

Now, as grandparents and great-grandparents, we have new ritual. I always serve dinner on Christmas Eve. Sometimes we've had Chinese food, once it was pizza. Some of the grandkids who are close come to eat and receive and give gifts. This year, two great-grands will be with us.

I'm going to serve Honey-baked ham--because I love it and it's easy and I know there'll be leftovers. I'm going to make scalloped potatoes and a broccoli salad to go with it.

Because I've had some heart problems and a procedure, I didn't go Christmas shopping at all. Our gift to each family is a check which they can spend as they wish and I also sent an assortment of Wolferman English muffins to each home.

Share with us what you do on Christmas Eve.

Marilyn

Saturday, December 21, 2013

Kindred Spirits and the woman who inspired the story

Junie Lee Mattice

 

When I met Junie Lee Mattice in Crescent City, I knew that I'd met a formidable person. She told me stories about the Tolowa people and along the way we bonded. I knew I had to write a book that included Junie and some of the history of her people.

That's when Kindred Spirits was conceived.



A Deputy Tempe Crabtree mystery, Junie appears in Kindred Spirits as two characters--her personality was so bold and strong, one character wasn't enough to embrace her.

When the book was finished and published, I traveled back to Crescent City where a celebration was given for Kindred Spirits in a local bed and breakfast. Junie and I sat side by side and autographed copies of the books for those who attended. And we both spoke at the luncheon that day.

We spent more time together and spoke again at the Crescent City library.

When we hugged goodbye that evening, that was the last time we were together. Junie Lee Mattice passed away this October. She was a wonderful woman and a great spokesperson for the Tolowa people. She is missed by her large family and all of her friends, including me.

Since Mundania Press is having a sale of 40% off all books in every format, if you haven't read Kindred Spirits yet, this would be a good time.

http://mundania.com/book.php?title=Kindred%20Spirits

Of course it is also available on Amazon and Barnes and Noble and other places books are sold.

Rest in peace, dear friend.

Marilyn Meredith

Friday, December 20, 2013

The Red Queen Dies, a Review


The Red Queen Dies Frankie Y Bailey
The Red Queen Dies
by Frankie Y. Bailey

The only Edgar Banquet I ever attended I was seated at a table near the back and next to me was Frankie Bailey. I’d never met her before but enjoyed visiting with her.
When P.J. Nunn asked if I’d like to review M. Bailey’s new mystery, The Red Queen Dies, I was thrilled to have the opportunity to, in a sense, renew that acquaintance.

The book is set in the future of 2019 in the city of Albany, New York and the protagonist, Detective Hannah McCabe, despite some advanced technology solves crime in the old-fashioned manner of collecting clues, interviewing witnesses and suspects, putting bit and pieces of information together like a puzzle, along with a large amount of gut-instinct.
The murders of two young women, followed by a third older and somewhat famous woman known as the Red Queen, send McCabe and her partner on a complicated case. So many unusual clues pop up that involve Alice in Wonderland, the Wizard of Oz, Abraham Lincoln and John Wilkes Booth, keeping the reader involved and wondering.

The fast pace of this mystery, wonderful characters, and the fresh and unusual plot kept this reader eagerly turning the page and wondering what was going to happen next.
A topnotch mystery with a refreshing and original detective!

 

Wednesday, December 18, 2013

Can a Cover Sell a Novel?


 

 
I hope so because I picked the cover photo for my new medical thriller Ignore the Pain.

 How did I have the audacity to pick the photo? I’ll avoid obvious answers and just say I’m no expert, but I’ve looked at lots of covers and have opinions.

 A good cover is like a good title. It suggests the topic of the book and is catchy. I like bright primary colors for thrillers and adventure books, pastels for romances, and dark moody colors for horror and mystery novels because the colors convey a message.

 Those of you who are sophisticated in your choice of covers have probably concluded that I’m very traditional. Now look at the cover of my new medical thriller.

 Ignore the Pain is set partially in Bolivia, and the heroine Sara Almquist is an epidemiologist serving as a public health consultant there. But this is a public health assignment gone awry. At one point Sara is chased across the roof of Iglesia de San Francisco in La Paz, Bolivia and peers down at the Witches Market below. Thus cover needed to suggest Bolivia and a woman adventurer.

 I looked at hundreds (maybe even thousands) of pictures of scenes in South America, None seemed right. They were too pretty and gave no hint about my protagonist. Then I saw this photo with the colors of the Bolivian flag drawn across the face of a blue-eyed woman, like Sara. This woman looked like she had guts.

 Time will tell whether I chose a cover photo that helps to sell the book.

Feeling guilty about writing a blog with so few facts, I surfed the WEB for information on “choosing a cover for a book.” I found blogs by authors showing readers two to five choices of covers for upcoming books and collecting votes for which cover was best. There were quite a few ads by professional cover designers who didn’t seem to want to admit their secrets. Nothing very interesting or new.

Billie Johnson, my publisher at Oak Tree Press, gave the most useful advice on selecting a cover photo. She called the picture we selected “a real grabber.” I hope this blog encourages you grab for attention when you select your next cover.

Blurb: In Ignore the Pain, Sara Almquist couldn’t say no when invited to be the epidemiologist on a public health mission to assess children’s health in Bolivia. Soon someone from her past in New Mexico is chasing her through the Witches’ Market of La Paz and trying to trap her at the silver mines of Potosí. Unfortunately, she can’t trust her new colleagues, especially the unsavory Xave Zack, because any one of them might be under the control of the coca industry in Bolivia.

 Bio: JL Greger is no longer a biology professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison; instead she’s putting tidbits of science into her novels.

 

 

Ignore the Pain is the third novel in a series that tracks the adventures of epidemiologist Sara Almquist and her more reserved sister – physician Linda Almquist. In the suspense novel Coming Flu, Sara identifies a drug kingpin trapped in a quarantined community , while tracking the spread of the deadly Philippine flu. In the medical mystery Murder: A New Way to Lose Weight, Linda Almquist must discover whether the killer is an ambitious young “diet doctor” or old-timers with buried secrets about the medical school.

 JL lives with Bug, her Japanese Chin dog and the only non-fiction character, in her novels. Her website is at http://www.jlgreger.com. Her blog JL Greger’s Bugs is at http://www.jlgregerblog.blogspot.com.

 Amazon sell links:


 Coming Flu: http://www.amazon.com/Coming-Flu-ebook/dp/B008WDL84O/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1372715303&sr=1-1&keywords=Coming+Flu


 

Monday, December 16, 2013

DON'T DREAM IT--WRITE IT!





By Sally Carpenter

 
Marilyn asked me to discuss about how I came about writing my current book, “The Sinister Sitcom Caper,” the second book in the Sandy Fairfax Teen Idol mystery series.

I’ve always been fascinated with television. Growing up in a small rural Midwest town, the three network channels were our principal form of entertainment. Even before the days of cable TV one could usually find something decent to watch. Sure, many of the shows of the 60s and 70s were silly, corny (anyone remember “Mr. Terrific”?) or brainless, but the programs were family-friendly and wildly entertaining, full of loveable characters and great personalities.

 As a kid my career ambition was to star in my very own TV show—without having to pay any dues first or wait tables, of course.

 My dream was fueled in my high school, which had a working TV studio. The senior TV production class produced short programs that aired to the local elementary schools. “Sesame Street” had just started at this time, so our studio had a puppet stage to use in the shows. I loved that class. We took turns acting with the puppets and running the camera.

 In fact, this class was where I wrote my first published piece. The company where the school bought its puppets mailed out a newsletter that published puppet plays. The newsletter accepted a short play I had written. My “payment” from the company was a free puppet (I chose a rabbit) that I gave to the school to use in the programs.

 Several decades later I finally realized my dream by landing a job as a page at Paramount Pictures in Hollywood. The pages gave the studio tours in the daytime and ushered the audiences for the sitcoms shoots in the evenings. Some of the shows were filmed on other lots, so I also worked at Sony (formerly MGM), CBS Radford, Fox and smaller studios. I met some fun people, worked hard, saw a few celebrities, and had a great time.

 I was never a TV actor but I could write a character who was—former teen idol Sandy Fairfax, star of the hit ‘70s show, Buddy Brave, Boy Sleuth. Like many actors whose star burned out after cancellation, when Buddy ended after four years, Sandy’s career faded and he fell into the bottle.

 Now it’s 1993. Sandy quits drinking and attempts to make a comeback—but dead bodies keep getting in his way. He manages to juggle sleuthing among his rehearsals and family issues.

 With this character, I can use my knowledge of the TV industry and live out my dream of being a star—without getting up early for a 5 a.m. call at the studio or going to auditions.

 In “The Sinister Sitcom Caper,” Sandy’s the guest star on “Off-Kelter,” a corny family situation comedy, and the lowest rated TV show of the 1993 fall season. Before rehearsals barely begin one of the actors drops dead at Sandy’s feet. He investigates, enlisting the aid of two of his new cast mates: a dwarf and an animal actor.

 During his snooping, we meet Sandy’s ex, his parents and his teenage son, all with their own “situations” going on. During rehearsals Sandy also encounters a beautiful choreographer—could this be love?

 Will Sandy solve the murder before the Friday night taping of “Off-Kelter” or will the elusive killer cancel our hero before the final credits?

 


Sally Carpenter is native Hoosier now living in Moorpark, Calif

She has a master’s degree in theater from Indiana State University. While in school her plays “Star Collector” and “Common Ground” were finalists in the American College Theater Festival One-Act Playwrighting Competition. “Common Ground” also earned a college creative writing award and “Star Collector” was produced in New York City.

Carpenter also has a master’s degree in theology and a black belt in tae kwon do.

She’s worked as an actress, freelance writer, college writing instructor, theater critic, jail chaplain, and tour guide/page for a major movie studio. She’s now employed at a community newspaper.

Her initial book in the Sandy Fairfax Teen Idol series, “The Baffled Beatlemaniac Caper,” was a 2012 Eureka! Award finalist for best first mystery novel.

Her short story, “Dark Nights at the Deluxe Drive-in,” appears in the 2013 anthology “Last Exit to Murder.”

“Faster Than a Speeding Bullet” was published in the “Plan B: Vol. 2” e-book anthology.

Her short story “The Pie-eyed Spy” appeared in the Nov. 23, 2013, issue of Kings River Life ezine.


She’s a member of Sisters in Crime/Los Angeles chapter. Contact her at Facebook or scwriter@earthlink.net.

 
Thanks for being my guest today, Sally. That was a fun post. I grew up in the L.A. area and went to all the live radio shows (no TV back then.) My dad worked for Paramount, so I was definitely a movie fan. I never had a desire to be an actor, though I wrote plays for my neighborhood friends to perform during the summer when I was a kid. And I must confess, I still watch General Hospital.
 

 

 

 

 

Sunday, December 15, 2013

Rocky Bluff Neighborhood


This could easily be a neighborhood in Rocky Bluff, California as it climbs the hillside. No two houses alike.

In this photo, the sky is blue, what fog there was in the early morning has burnt off b the sun.
What a pleasant place to live.

That is until the body comes ashore in the surf.

Yes, that's how Murder in the Worst Degree begins.

The pub date for the book is March of 2014, but I'll be dropping little hints about it right here on my blog between book reviews and guest author posts.

Stay tuned.

And if you haven't read the latest yet, Dangerous Impulses, be sure and get it an catch up with what's going on with the Rocky Bluff P.D. and their loved ones.

http://www.amazon.com/Dangerous-Impulses-Rocky-Bluff-Volume/dp/1610090608/ref=tmm_pap_title_0?ie=UTF8&qid=1386254600&sr=1-1

Marilyn aka F. M. Meredith

Don't Miss Out on the Big Sale at Mundania!

This is the perfect time to catch up on the Deputy Tempe Crabtree series.

All print and e-books are on sale for 40% off until December 31st. All you have to do is put in the code HOLIDAY!

If you've bought someone an e-reader for Christmas, what a great way to load up on some books for them to read.

http://mundania.com/index.php

This is a good place to start to find the books that you want. Here's a list of the Tempe Crabtree mystery series from the beginning.

Deadly Trail (prequel)
Deadly Omen
Unequally Yoked
Intervention
Wing Beat
Calling the Dead
Judgment Fire
Kindred Spirits
Dispel the Mist
Invisible Path
Bears With Us
Raging Water
Spirit Shapes

Wishing you a Merry Christmas and some great reading.

Marilyn

 
I love the covers of this series, most were done by Ana Winsom, and she's done a terrific job!

Friday, December 13, 2013

Planning for a Safe Holiday Season by Keith Bettinger

(Today I have a guest who is a retired police officer and a friend, who's giving us some great advice.)
 

The Christmas season is upon us and the economy is in the tank.  When I was a cop we used to say that a bad economy was job security for us.  However, for the general public and police officers and their families, this is also the season to become a victim.  A few thoughts from an old crime prevention officer come to mind to make the holidays happier and safer for you and your families. 

When going to the mall to shop during the Christmas season, if the mall provides a parking valet – use it.  Don’t walk across a crowded parking lot with arms full of bags and packages.  Let the valet go out and bring your car curbside for you to load with your purchases near the door of the mall.  The few extra dollars you spend paying and tipping the valet will pay bigger dividends for the holidays than life insurance or medical insurance policies. 

If you must walk across the parking lot, shop with a companion so you are not alone.  If you must walk alone, keep your cell phone in your coat pocket so it is easily accessible if you need to dial 911. If your car has an alarm system, keep the keys in your hand so you can press the alarm button and sound your car alarm if approached by a suspicious person. Also, walk with your car keys points protruding between your fingers.  If attacked you can use these to scratch, poke, and yes, stab the attacker about the face.

Once you are done shopping and are in your automobile, make sure you lock your doors for the ride home.  From a well lighted part of the mall, use your cell phone to call home so family members know when to expect you.  

If you need cash from an ATM, do not go alone – even if it is a drive up ATM.  Have your passenger keep surveying the area, to make sure you are not being approached by someone intent on robbing you.  If a person does approach you, leave the area immediately.  If you have an automobile alarm system, hit that red button and sound that alarm to scare him away and call passerby attention to your dangerous situation. 

Make sure you get your receipts and your credit cards back after making each purchase. Keep track of purchases and check them against your incoming bills to make sure no one has obtained your credit card number and made purchases against your account. 

Here’s hoping you have a safe, healthy and happy Christmas. 

Keith
Secretary - Shields of Long Island
Secretary - Public Safety Writers Association
Author of: Fighting Crime With "Some" Day and Lenny
Author of: End Of Watch Author of: Murder In McHenry Winner of 19 writing awards

Thank you, Keith, for this timely advice.

Wednesday, December 11, 2013

Carola Dunn Visits Again


 
Hello, folks. Thanks to Marilyn for inviting me.
This being the twenty-first mystery in the Daisy Dalrymple series, I feel as if Daisy has come of age. When I started, with Death at Wentwater Court, she was twenty-five, unmarried, hoping to scratch out a living with her writing. Over 21 books, she's aged by four years and acquired a Scotland Yard detective for a husband, along with a stepdaughter and twin babies.
 
 

Looking back...
She still writes articles for UK and US magazines, but owing to a lucky inheritance, that's just spending money now.
 
Daisy and DCI Alec Fletcher have travelled all over England, across the Atlantic by ocean liner, andacross America in a biplane, finding suspicious bodies wherever they go.
 
The books have been published in English in the US, UK, and worldwide, in hardcover, paperback, large print, ebook, and audio. There have been German translations, and most recently Polish.


 

 
 
 
What's next for Daisy and Alec? I confess to having considered retirement after writing Heirs of the Body. Not because I was or am tired of Daisy—I still love her dearly, but because 21 books seemed like enough for any series! Then my editor at Minotaur, unasked, offered me contracts for two more. That was awfully hard to turn down.
 
 
 
Impossible, in fact. So Daisy is presently embroiled with another murder. For once I know whodunnit—it isn't always so. But I'm wondering how Daisy and Alec are going to find out, and what adventures they'll meet along the way!  
 
 
Bio
 Carola Dunn is the author of over 55 historical novels, including 21 mysteries in the Daisy Dalrymple series (England 1920s), 3 Cornish Mysteries (around 1970), and 32 Regencies. She was born and grew up in England, and after 20 years in Southern California now makes her home in Eugene, Oregon, with her lab/border collie Trillian. Her favourite occupations are reading, gardening, classical music, and bird-watching. She has two wonderful grandchildren.
 
 

Monday, December 9, 2013

Cup of Demons, Christian horror


http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Ddigital-text&field-keywords=Cup%20of%20Demons%20by%20Marilyn%20Meredith

 
Is the inheritance Maginel received from her great Aunt Magda a gift or a curse? Haunted by ancestral ghosts, plagued by demonic creatures, Maginel flees from her home. Upon her return as an adult, Maginel seeks to remove the barrier that prevents her from marrying the man she loves, she enters into a life and death battle for her soul.

 
This is also what I like to call Christian horror--and it is a scary tale.
 
Perfect for downloading on your Kindle.
 
Try it, you might like it.
 
And just for fun, when I was writing this book, I decided that all of Maginel's relatives with the "gift" should have unusual names beginning with M. I found some great ones, including Maginel.
 
Marilyn
 
 
 
 


Sunday, December 8, 2013

Deeds of Darkness, Young Adult Horror for Kindle


 
 
 
 
When good and evil collide in the small town of Yokut Springs, Madeline Mahoney is forced to put her friendship and religious beliefs to the ultimate test. The story unravels when Madeline finds out that her best friend's mother, Dian Reddick, is the High Priestess to a coven of witches. Madeline, being very active in the Christian community, finds the mere thought of witches ridiculous and refuses to believe such utter nonsense. But after watching one of the witches meetings and witnessing the initiation of their final member, she can't help but have doubts. Especially when her best friend, Lynette, convinces her that a romance spell is just what she needs to capture her long time crush, Brian.
 
If buying a Kindle for a teen, this might be just the book to purchase for a teen who likes scary books.
 
The cover is a bit deceiving in that there is no skeleton but there are witches--but the heroine is teenager, Madeline Mahoney. As one horrible thing happens after another, Madeline is the only one who figures out what has gone wrong in Yokut Springs.
 
Marilyn


Friday, December 6, 2013

Cherish Them While They're Young by C.C. Gevry


 
When my girls were just toddlers, I spent a good deal of time yanking my hair out and wondering when I would get time to rest. Between playdates, preschool, teaching Sunday school, and entertaining them, it never seemed to end. If I am entirely honest, there were days I resented how much time the girls demanded.

Empty nesters kept telling me to cherish these moments with the children, because they are over too soon. I laughed, well, probably snorted at them. What did they know? I had other things I wanted to do, too. What about my writing? What about the chance to socialize with people over the age of 4 every once in a while? When did I get to think about me for a change?

My feelings were a bit confusing. I had wanted to be a stay-at-home mom for so long. Why didn’t I enjoy it more?

Maybe part of it was because I had worked full-time since I was 18. Now, I finally had a chance to pursue my writing dreams and there were these little rugrats monopolizing all my time. I was in groups that kept telling me if you wanted to write, you would find the time. Heck, I was too busy trying to find time to sleep, never mind write. I struggled for many months and thought there was no way I could ever balance it all; no matter how organized I am.

That’s when God interfered.

“Knock. Knock.”

“Yes?”

“Remember me?”

“Um, yes. I teach my students about You every week in Sunday school.”

“So why aren’t you listening to yourself?”

“Huh?”

“You tell the kids God listens to their prayers. You tell them all they have to do is ask Me for help. Then you plod along frustrated and angry but never come to Me with your burdens.”

“Whoops. You have a point there.”

God turned my head that day. With His help, I found a better balance. I can’t say there aren’t hectic days. This year has been full of them. But seeking God’s peace for my life and being open to taking my direction from Him has made a huge difference.

In the years since, I’ve learned those empty nesters knew what they were talking about. My girls, now both double digits, seem to need me less and less. The little things we used to do together have gone by the wayside. Thankfully, for the most part, they have been replaced with other things, but their time spent with friends instead of family has increased. In a few years, they’ll be off to college and finding their own way in the world.

Perhaps wanting to cherish them is part of why I ended up writing for children. It certainly wasn’t my intention at the beginning of my career; but my children are a great source of inspiration for all I do. How can I turn their antics into stories youngsters will enjoy? Which of my silly moments get the greatest laughs? What zaniness in our lives can be interesting fodder for books?

Tapping into those moments reminds me how precious they are and makes me want to hold on to them even more.
 
 

C.C Gevry is a children’s author from Western Massachusetts. A Christmas Kindness is her first book with 4RV Publishing. She is also a member of the SCBWI. Ms. Gevry is married with two young children and a son who is married. Visit her online at http://ccgevry.com

About the book:

Eight-year-old Robert is eager to share his wish list with Santa at the mall on Christmas Eve. When he meets Glenn, who has only one request for Santa, Robert is confused over what he should do. Can he cast aside what he wants and ask Santa to bring his new friend a special gift?

Purchase information:







 


 


 

 

 

 

 

Thursday, December 5, 2013

First Teaser for the Next Rocky Bluff P.D. Crime Novel


 
Since I just sent off the corrections needed on the first galley proof for Murder in the Worst Degree  it will be a while until it will be available for purchase. The target date for publication is this coming March.

At this stage, I can't even envision a cover.

For those of you not familiar with this series, Rocky Bluff is a fictional beach town located between Santa Barbara and Ventura. And though it might have some similarities to Carpenteria, it's located farther south so it is in Ventura county. Despite the fact that it isn't a real place, it seems very real to me. I can see it in my mind's eye and of course I visit each time I write or think about one of the books.

The series centers around the men and women who work for the Rocky Bluff Police Department and their families. I like to think of them as an ensemble cast and hope that readers are like me and want to know how things are progressing in their lives.

Though every book is complete in that whatever crimes crop up will be solved by The End, the characters and whatever problems they are facing continue on.

If you're wondering about the title, a friend from Nipomo suggested it for me and I decided to start writing and see what happened.

One of the major characters in the plot that unfolded called Evelyn Cullet is named after someone who won a contest to be a character in my next book. Evelyn is an Internet friend and a fellow mystery writer.  I hope she likes her namesake.
 
That's enough for the moment.
 
If you'd like to see what happened in the latest book available, Dangerous Impulses is available in paper and for Kindle through Amazon.
 
 
or
 
 
 
                                                                                                                                                             

Tuesday, December 3, 2013

Our Writing Presentation


Shirley Hickman and Marilyn Meredith
 
Shirley and I decided to give a presentation on How to Get Published. We weren't sure we'd have many attendees because we were in competition with many Christmas boutiques, but to our surprise a nice group showed up.
 
We spoke about what it takes to be a writer, learning, finding the right publisher, and what to do once you've signed a contract and actually have a book. We come from two different perspectives as our journeys have been different.
 
Yes, we had our books for sale, you can see them at each end of the table. But selling books is not why I do this.
 
So why do you, you ask.
 
Because I love sharing and helping new writers. If it hadn't been for all the writers along the way who were willing to give presentations and seminars, speak at conferences, I wouldn't be the writers I am today. I learned more from other writers than from any book I ever read about writing.
 
I also love to speak about the writing process.
 
And yes, I did sell a few books.
 
Marilyn



Sunday, December 1, 2013

Indian Paintbrush by Marilyn Meredith

 
 
Product Details

Indian Paintbrush once had a different title. This is the first book of mine ever published way back in 1982. At that time it was called Trail to Glory--a name the publisher chose. Indian Paintbrush is a more fitting title as there are references to the flower all through the book.

An historical family saga, Indian Paintbrush, is based on family genealogy, my mother's side of the family. When my sister did the genealogy, I was amazed by how brave the women all were and able to support themselves when necessary in a time when women relied on men.

To write the story I had to do a lot of research about places and people I knew nothing about. I learned about early Wisconsin and the Menomenee Indians and made up a whole story about a young girl who disappeared. (The family legends about this were so far-fetched, I thought my version sounded far more realistic.)

I learned a lot about relatives I actually knew, like my great-aunt and my grandparents, even a big secret that never surfaced until my sister's search into genealogy. (And my grandparents were long gone before this book came out.)

The story is as accurate as it can be, but much is fictionalized.

This is the book that I rewrote and rewrote before it was accepted by an editor at a big New York publishing house.

I am tickled to have it revived and able to be once again read. I hope you'll enjoy it.

http://www.amazon.com/Indian-Paintbrush-Marilyn-Meredith-ebook/dp/B00FWAM76I/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1382280554&sr=1-1&keywords=Indian+Paintbrush+by+Marilyn+Meredith

Or  http://tinyurl.com/l66ue7w

Marilyn

Friday, November 29, 2013

Death by Misadventure by E. E. Smith


 
 
 
 
 
 

 
People who don't know me very well will invariably ask what the word "caboose" is doing in my strange email address. That's when I have to explain that I used to own one, and so it came to mind when a young computer wizard was trying to concoct an email address for me and finding that anything with "Smith" in it was already taken. He asked for something absolutely unique, and "caboose" was the only word I could think of that no one else would be using. And it worked. My email address became caboose.smith@earthlink.net.
 
Why in the world would anyone want to own a caboose, you may ask. You might have to read my secondnovel, Times Like These, to understand such madness. In the book I explain that I grew up on the railroad, back when there were steam trains. As the daughter of a station agent, I was often allowed to ride in the caboose, along with the conductor and the brakeman, just for the fun of it. To me, it was like a playhouse, and I dreamed of having one of my own someday. A half century later, that dream became a reality. I hired an architect to find one and restore it for me. The one he found was an old wooden cupola caboose, built in 1912. It had long ago outlived its usefulness as the last car attached to freight trains and was sitting empty, vandalized and rotting on the fairgrounds in Calistoga, in the Napa Valley. I had it hauled up to Nevada City, a quaint little town in the Sierra Nevada foothills, where it began life anew as a completely restored and refurbished writing studio. I bought a three bedroom house to have enough acreage to accommodate it as an "outbuilding" on the property.  When it was finished, six months later, it had a bathroom, complete with shower, a kitchen, a pellet stove/fireplace, and its own cable TV. It was very picturesque there, nestled among the pine trees.
 
I was a playwright at that time, and used my cozy little studio to write three plays in the years that I owned it. Eventually, I needed to move on. The summers were beautiful, but the winters in the foothills can be brutal, and the power outages frequent. During those times, the water lines to the caboose would freeze and break, flooding the bathroom and kitchen before becoming frozen ponds. The pellet stove needed electricity to operate, so there was no heat when the power went off. The walls of a caboose are not insulated, so the temperature inside was the same as the outside, often below freezing. 
I sold it along with the house, and have never been back to Nevada City to see what it looks like now. I want to remember it the way it was in the photo, the realization of a lifelong dream!  
 
Book Blurb: 

The sign on her office door reads  "ALEXIS J. SMITH - Discreet Inquiries, but a new client of her fledgling detective agency seems to think it means Murder Incorporated. The client, one Kate Faraday, is a former schoolmate (Sacramento High, class of '41) who wants to hire Lexie to find her husband, Frank. During their initial interview it becomes clear that she doesn't want him back "dead or alive," she wants him dead!  

If it were anyone else, the intrepid young private investigator would never have taken the job, but there is a problem. Lexie herself has been in love with Frank ever since they were all together in high school. She makes a desperate decision to find him and warn him of his wife's mad intentions.

She travels to England and finds Frank staying at a country inn called The Old Vicarage, next to a little Norman church still haunted by a 12th Century ghost. What she discovers reveals a woman bent on vengeance, not only on her husband, but on Lexie, as well. Are they both marked for murder? How all this plays out, and culminates in a shoot-out at The Old Vicarage, is the climax of the story -- but not the end. 

 

E.E. (Evelyn Eileen) Smith first attended the University of Iowa, and later received a B.A. in Fine Arts from California State University Long Beach.
 
Known earlier as a playwright, her works include PLAYTIME IN LONDON; BOARDINGHOUSE STEW;  WARTIME RECIPES;  THE TEMPERATE ZONE  (based on Edith Wharton's short story);  GHOST WRITERS  (based on two  stories by Wharton and Henry James);  RUNAWAY TRAINS;  A FLAG FOR MARIA;  PRIVATE LIES (a spoof on the play by Noel Coward);  REVELATIONS,  A GAME FOR THREE OR MORE COUPLES;  three one-act plays, together titled RYAN'S REUNION, and a collection of ten-minute comedies together titled THE BRITISH ARE COMING

Her plays have been performed in Massachusetts, Oklahoma, Kentucky, and both northern and southern California. One play has been published. 

Writing credits include a Drama Award from FS Theatrebooks, New York,
(for BOARDINGHOUSE STEW);  awards from Writers Digest (for PRIVATE LIES and PLAYTIME IN LONDON);  and the Gem Award from Jewel Box Theatre,   Oklahoma City (for WARTIME RECIPES).

E. E. Smith lives close to her native San Francisco where she now writes   books and short stories instead of plays.  One story was published in Writers' Forum:  Britain's Best Magazine for Writers, in 2006. The play, WARTIME RECIPES, first performed in Oklahoma City in 1998, was reprised there in 2010. Her first novel, BOARDINGHOUSE STEW, was published in 2009, and the New Edition published in 2011. The second novel, TIMES LIKE THESE, was also published in 2011, and IN LOVE AND WAR, a memoir, was published in 2012. 


She is a regular contributor to Psychology Today. To see her blog, go to 


Her website is  www.eesmithwriter.com

Also follow her on Facebook.